Why?

If you ever had been around a small child, the word “Why” can become the most frustrating word you’ll ever encounter right after “No”. Every answer you give is quickly challenge with another “Why” until you have no more answers and you snap with the default answer of “Because!” But before you snap, remember to keep telling yourself that this is a critical process in the development of that child. Being inquisitive is how we all learn and grow intellectually.

So what happened to us later in life? Why do we stop asking? What is it that made us avoid challenging the status quo? Maybe it’s because we still hear the echo of ‘why’ or maybe we are afraid to remind ourselves of three words that would spark our quest for answers; “I Don’t Know”. The technique of asking why five times to get to the root of an issue was originally developed by Sakichi Toyoda and was used within the Toyota Motor Corporation during the evolution of its manufacturing methodologies. It is a critical component of problem-solving training, delivered as part of the induction into the Toyota Production System. The 5 Whys method, as expressed by Sakichi Toyoda, was “the basis of Toyota’s scientific approach . . . by repeating why five times, the nature of the problem as well as its solution becomes clear.”

Problem solving may have been the original application, yet this same technique can also be adapted to an earlier stage of development of an idea or perceived innovation. Asking the 5 Whys at the beginning of a project can reveal many aspects that may be overlooked. Like a small child asking why, it is important to understand the idea’s purpose. Finding its purpose, will help determine the viability and adaptability of the idea. Below, is a graphic I use to help determine my continuation of an idea. 5 whys webStart with  “Why do it?” Walk around the circle and ask yourself each question as it relates to your idea or situation. If at any time, you do not have a strong and clear answer to any one of the 5 whys around the circle, then, as you get back to the beginning, ask yourself the first one again. There are two steps you can take from here; the first is to uncover the answers to each question or move away from the idea (for now). Record the idea and store it until all the answers can be found.

I have come to believe and trust this method when developing an idea before investing time and resources. Too many times I committed to a project that either served no greater value to the existing condition or would never be accepted as a new solution. I dedicated many hours and resources keeping a project moving simply because I was blind to the answers I would have discover had I only simply asked these five whys.

So, before you act on an idea and follow the credo of “Fail Fast” on the deliverable, ask yourself why, why, why, why, why and never just answer “Because.”

Remember this… “To Determine Success one must Measure against one’s Purpose.”

#InnovateSTL Discussion

Today, St. Louis was graced by four powerful innovation leaders.

InnovateSTL
What’s next for those wanting to be innovative in their companies? First visualize your purpose and then plan your action.

 

Thoughts on Innovation – The Box

Achieving innovation or new ideas requires a different path of thinking. I have written about this in an earlier post; “The Path to Innovate.” Some of the fastest and most direct methods I prefer is to influence the traditional thinking with fresh insights. These insights come from outside the box. It is very rare that innovation develops from the thinking found within the walls of the box, so getting fresh ideas needs external input.

IN Out of the Box

The first of two suggestions is to bring in fresh thinking or guidance from outside your box, a.k.a. your organization or office. As the an old saying goes “You can’t read the label from inside the jar.” Too many companies and individuals are unable to see the clues and insights due to the being to close to the situation. Obtaining new ideas requires something new or different from that of the embedded thinking. Bring in outside help.

The second method I find works well is getting out of the physical box. Climb out, see the sky and then interview people from the outside such as customers, prospects or the public. Ask questions that are open-ended and have no single answer. The more conversation you can drive, the richer the ideas can be. When you ask others who are not close to the situation, they have a different point of view. This different POV is gold to new ideas.

Finally, as a parting gift, a third method if you can’t do either of the two and you are shackled to your desk, is a method that is promoted by William Donius, author of “Though Revolution.” Use your non-dominant hand to get a second opinion or idea about your situation. Follow the link to get more information. He explains it better than I.

So, the thINKing to get new ideas is to change the direction or the source of your inspiration and to jump out of the thinking rut we all create for ourselves.

Until next time, don’t be afraid to ask someone else to help you create something new.

An Occurrence of Innovation

I have written and drawn on this topic before and from my earlier post, it has driven some very interesting conversations with groups who focus on conditions and mechanics of creating an innovation and action of being innovative. This subject of innovation and being innovative is a very complex and multifaceted issue. It has created a major divide in the thinking by those misinformed, highly involved and extremely learned.

In my earlier post on this subject “A Path To Innovate”, I focused on a methodology or the thinking process and avoided any mechanical technique. I have no wish to add fuel to an already heated, blazing topic, yet I do want to add something to the topic. I would like to add a bit broader visual about the occurrence of innovation. In my earlier diagram, I focused on the change to the thinking process as part of achieving an innovation.

I realized, by taking a step back further, I could see how an occurrence of innovation evolves and comes into existence. This not a change to my previous post or the visual I created, rather an expansion or companion piece. If you had read the earlier post you will notice that there are similar elements in both, however the key additions are “Status Quo” and “Communicate.”

InnoOccurs

I challenged myself to understand why there is a need to drive an innovation. I realized that the “Status Quo” is only remains as affective as the environment allows. When change occurs around the set item, its “Status Quo”, a need grows from that environmental change. This stimulates the process that can promote the path to innovation, but does not guarantee that it will occur only that it should.

In the second stage which I have labelled “Ideate”, the need has grown to somewhat of a pain issue. The item no longer fulfills the function due to the changes around it. This creates an opportunity for some enhancement or the creation of something new to fulfill the growing need. It is this need that generates new ideas, solutions to resolve where the status quo no longer applies. Yet, this phase also does not ensure that an innovation will come to exist. only the idea that it could.

The last phase begins to bring the innovation to life. To “be” an innovation, it must have two parts to exist. First, it must be constructed and brought into existence, not merely an idea that could be, but an idea that is. The second part of this is that the idea must be communicated. For an innovation to take hold it must be constructed and allowed to be shared so others are aware of its existence.

When it comes to innovation, the easy part is identifying a need and having an idea to solve it. The hard part is actually making it happen and have others apply it. An innovative idea can not live inside a vacuum, it must be constructed and shared to truly become an innovation. So take that idea and make it the next innovation.

Have a great day, and an innovative future.

Four Decisions

Over the past 25+ years working with businesses of all sizes, you come to believe one simple truth; size does not matter when it comes to decisions. All can be life changing or devastating.  Sure, the number of people, dollars or customers may change, but at the end of the day, all businesses owners need to make decisions that will impact their business.

I have been told by some of the best business minds, psychologist, and many entrepreneurs, ‘focus on one major decision at a time.’ This is good advice about 90% of the time, because if you making those decisions all at the same time, you’ll go crazy and eventually destroy what you are trying to build. Stay focused.

That leads me back to the title and the graphic below. In my years of listening to owners, executive management teams, board members and entrepreneurs, I have identified, in most of my meetings, the four main decisions that groups face that creates action fear.

I am not going to label these except by a single letter. I’ll let you create the narrative. If you’re facing any big decision, I am sure you can identify very clearly by one of these four images. Which one stands out to you?

4 Decisions

I use this sets of images to help groups and individuals to uncover their underlining issue(s) so that I can help them understand all the issues facing them at this point. By begin the process with these images, it guides the conversation and visual thinking towards a solution. So ask again, which one stands out the most to you now?

Try it out for yourself

Draw the image that most stands out to you in the center of a piece of paper small enough so you are able to add comments around the image. Now ask yourself the question that you feel relates best to that image. Write down that question just above the image. Highlight this question so that it stay predominant on the page. Now, jot down simple, short answers as they come to you over the next day or so. See if an answer doesn’t present itself, even if it’s the one you may not like, but must do.

Good luck and happy visual thINKing.

To learn more about this type of visual thinking called Mind Mapping, check out some of these sites for more ideas. 

Video File; Tony Buzan “How to Mind Map”

WikiHow: “How to Make A Mind Map”